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The New Hampshire State House is one place added to the My New Hampshire map. Photo courtesy www.nh.gov/nhdhr.

The New Hampshire State House is one place added to the My New Hampshire map. Photo courtesy www.nh.gov/nhdhr.

Division of Historical Resources Seeking Submissions for Interactive Map

What does “My New Hampshire” look like to you? That’s what the Division of Historical Resources wants to know.

The state’s historic preservation office is asking for Granite Staters to contribute to the “My New Hampshire” map, an interactive website that highlights favorite historical sites around the state. So far, there are more than 100 submissions.

The My New Hampshire map has places listed in all counties ... even one in the Atlantic Ocean.

The My New Hampshire map has places listed in all counties … even one in the Atlantic Ocean.

SEA/SEIU Local 1984 member Tanya Krajcik, who worked on the project, said they’re looking for places that are special to the people submitting them.

“There’s really no wrong thing to put out there,” she said. “It doesn’t have to be a building — it can be a bridge, a park, a farmhouse. We’ve got archaeological sites that are out there. Our hope is to have people submit a variety of resources.”

Submitting a place is easy: From the Historical Resources website (nh.gov/nhdhr), you can click on “submit photo” or “view map” in the quick links box on the right. After answering a few questions, including why the place is special to you, you can upload a photo and pinpoint the location on a map. Krajcik noted there isn’t a limit on entries — people are welcome to submit more than one place.

Krajcik said the origin of the project was two-fold.

“First, it’s a fun, personal way to have Granite Staters connect us with their favorite historical resources,” Krajcik said. “The second part is that we’re responsible for creating a statewide preservation plan every five years. We’re always looking for public input and looking for creative ways of doing that.”

A bonus of the project is that it’s a way to engage people from all over the state, and it’s happened – there are listings in every county and Krajcik said they’re still in data-gathering mode.

“Once we have everything, the idea is there will be a more user-friendly story map,” she said.

There isn’t a hard deadline for submissions, Krajcik said, even after the finished product is unveiled. There is a plus, however, for getting your submission in promptly. Photos received by Sept. 8 may be used to illustrate the upcoming version of the statewide preservation plan.

If you have any questions, you can visit the Historical Resources website at www.nh.gov/nhdhr or call 271-3483.

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